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6 Documents to Make Job Searching Easier

By Cheryl Morris, OTR/L

Scoring a great job isn't just about your interview skills; it can take a lot of paperwork, too! There are several documents that you should always have a working copy of to save yourself time and frustration. You'll need to keep them updated whenever there is a major life change or at least once a year. I keep my items on Google Drive because it is accessible from any computer or my phone, but another cloud storage option may work better for you.

  1. Obviously you should have a working résumé at all times. At least once a year, you can update your skills and any major projects you've worked on. If you're really on top of things, you could have a running curriculum vitae (CV) with details of each major project and life accomplishments. I have never needed to provide a CV for a job, but this is required for most education and research opportunities.
  2. Though it shouldn't take up room on your résumé, you should keep a list of your employers' addresses and phone numbers because this is often called for on job applications. You may also need to include the address of the college(s) you attended.
  3. In a similar vein, you'll want to have a running document with contact information for your references. Include phone, email, and mailing address because everyone wants something different. I also keep a couple of different lists going based on what type of job I'm applying for (i.e., one for hospital work, one for pediatric work).
  4. Background checks are frequently required for OT jobs, which means you should also keep a record of your own address for the past 7 years or so. If you're like me, it becomes really difficult to remember all 7 apartments you've had across the U.S.! Also note the dates that you were at each address.
  5. For an extensive job search, I keep a list of viable job opportunities. I list out whether there is an active opening, what steps I have taken, and who my contact is at the company. This lets me have a single place to see where my prospects are, which places are calling me back, and when I last heard from them. If Plan A doesn't work out, it's easy to see what else is available.
  6. It's a good idea to have a working long-term plan. In this could be personal goals for how you want to develop as a clinician, where you see yourself in 5 to 10 years, and how you see your role developing. Writing these goals down is the first step to making them a reality, and being familiar with your own goals is important in an interview. It's OK to have only a few plans or change your mind, but it's good to have something to shoot for in your professional development.

Having these documents won't entirely streamline your job application process. There have been numerous times when I just want to hand people a few of these papers (or already have), but I still have to fill out a repetitive application by hand because every applicant has to fill out the standard form. It's a pet peeve of mine, but not likely to go away anytime soon, so be aware of it. Spend a little time now to streamline your application process later! Good luck finding a great first job!

Cheryl Morris is an occupational therapist who has been writing the OT Notes blog for nearly six years. She has practiced in a variety of settings and is currently enjoying her dream job in a Maryland school district. Visit her blog at otnotes.blogspot.com and follow her on Twitter @otnotes.

- See more at: http://www.otjoblink.org/6docs.asp#sthash.CYpW7xCW.dpuf

By Cheryl Morris, OTR/L

Scoring a great job isn't just about your interview skills; it can take a lot of paperwork, too! There are several documents that you should always have a working copy of to save yourself time and frustration. You'll need to keep them updated whenever there is a major life change or at least once a year. I keep my items on Google Drive because it is accessible from any computer or my phone, but another cloud storage option may work better for you.

  1. Obviously you should have a working résumé at all times. At least once a year, you can update your skills and any major projects you've worked on. If you're really on top of things, you could have a running curriculum vitae (CV) with details of each major project and life accomplishments. I have never needed to provide a CV for a job, but this is required for most education and research opportunities.
  2. Though it shouldn't take up room on your résumé, you should keep a list of your employers' addresses and phone numbers because this is often called for on job applications. You may also need to include the address of the college(s) you attended.
  3. In a similar vein, you'll want to have a running document with contact information for your references. Include phone, email, and mailing address because everyone wants something different. I also keep a couple of different lists going based on what type of job I'm applying for (i.e., one for hospital work, one for pediatric work).
  4. Background checks are frequently required for OT jobs, which means you should also keep a record of your own address for the past 7 years or so. If you're like me, it becomes really difficult to remember all 7 apartments you've had across the U.S.! Also note the dates that you were at each address.
  5. For an extensive job search, I keep a list of viable job opportunities. I list out whether there is an active opening, what steps I have taken, and who my contact is at the company. This lets me have a single place to see where my prospects are, which places are calling me back, and when I last heard from them. If Plan A doesn't work out, it's easy to see what else is available.
  6. It's a good idea to have a working long-term plan. In this could be personal goals for how you want to develop as a clinician, where you see yourself in 5 to 10 years, and how you see your role developing. Writing these goals down is the first step to making them a reality, and being familiar with your own goals is important in an interview. It's OK to have only a few plans or change your mind, but it's good to have something to shoot for in your professional development.

Having these documents won't entirely streamline your job application process. There have been numerous times when I just want to hand people a few of these papers (or already have), but I still have to fill out a repetitive application by hand because every applicant has to fill out the standard form. It's a pet peeve of mine, but not likely to go away anytime soon, so be aware of it. Spend a little time now to streamline your application process later! Good luck finding a great first job!

Cheryl Morris is an occupational therapist who has been writing the OT Notes blog for nearly six years. She has practiced in a variety of settings and is currently enjoying her dream job in a Maryland school district. Visit her blog at otnotes.blogspot.com and follow her on Twitter @otnotes.

- See more at: http://www.otjoblink.org/6docs.asp#sthash.CYpW7xCW.dpuf

OT Job Link 

By Cheryl Morris, OTR/L

Scoring a great job isn't just about your interview skills; it can take a lot of paperwork, too! There are several documents that you should always have a working copy of to save yourself time and frustration. You'll need to keep them updated whenever there is a major life change or at least once a year. I keep my items on Google Drive because it is accessible from any computer or my phone, but another cloud storage option may work better for you. 

  1. Obviously you should have a working résumé at all times. At least once a year, you can update your skills and any major projects you've worked on. If you're really on top of things, you could have a running curriculum vitae (CV) with details of each major project and life accomplishments. I have never needed to provide a CV for a job, but this is required for most education and research opportunities.
  2. Though it shouldn't take up room on your résumé, you should keep a list of your employers' addresses and phone numbers because this is often called for on job applications. You may also need to include the address of the college(s) you attended.
  3. In a similar vein, you'll want to have a running document with contact information for your references. Include phone, email, and mailing address because everyone wants something different. I also keep a couple of different lists going based on what type of job I'm applying for (i.e., one for hospital work, one for pediatric work).
  4. Background checks are frequently required for OT jobs, which means you should also keep a record of your own address for the past 7 years or so. If you're like me, it becomes really difficult to remember all 7 apartments you've had across the U.S.! Also note the dates that you were at each address.
  5. For an extensive job search, I keep a list of viable job opportunities. I list out whether there is an active opening, what steps I have taken, and who my contact is at the company. This lets me have a single place to see where my prospects are, which places are calling me back, and when I last heard from them. If Plan A doesn't work out, it's easy to see what else is available.
  6. It's a good idea to have a working long-term plan. In this could be personal goals for how you want to develop as a clinician, where you see yourself in 5 to 10 years, and how you see your role developing. Writing these goals down is the first step to making them a reality, and being familiar with your own goals is important in an interview. It's OK to have only a few plans or change your mind, but it's good to have something to shoot for in your professional development.

Having these documents won't entirely streamline your job application process. There have been numerous times when I just want to hand people a few of these papers (or already have), but I still have to fill out a repetitive application by hand because every applicant has to fill out the standard form. It's a pet peeve of mine, but not likely to go away anytime soon, so be aware of it. Spend a little time now to streamline your application process later! Good luck finding a great first job!

Cheryl Morris is an occupational therapist who has been writing the OT Notes blog for nearly six years. She has practiced in a variety of settings and is currently enjoying her dream job in a Maryland school district. Visit her blog at otnotes.blogspot.com and follow her on Twitter @otnotes.