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Session Descriptions

Session Listings, Availability & Locations
Geico Break Sponsor
Programs and sessions are organized chronologically by day and time.
All educational sessions are at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta.
The location for each session is listed with its description.

Download the program guide here.

Types of Sessions
(PF)—Platform Sessions on Friday
(PS)—Platform Sessions on Saturday
(PO)—Poster Sessions

This Specialty Conference has been completed. For future AOTA conferences please visit the Conferences & Events page. Click here to access your CE Transcript.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2013

8:30 am – 9:30 am
Keynote Address
Centennial 1&2

The Search for and Identification of Signature Pedagogies in Occupational Therapy Education
Patricia Schaber PhD, OTR/L, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
The search and identification for signature pedagogies in OT is a recursive process that takes place as we think about classrooms, reflect on the deeper aims of teaching, and wrestle with the shared disciplinary attitudes, values and beliefs that are transferred to and inspire our students. Currently, higher education is undergoing transformation that maps to trends where education is increasingly decentralized, digitalized and homogenized; this creates challenges to developing mentoring relationships, affecting student attitudes, and actively engaging with students. How will we preserve OT signature pedagogies and move forward within the new currents higher education?
Respondent: Ronald M. Cervero, PhD
Department of Lifelong Education, Administration and Policy
College of Education
The University of Georgia
Athens, GA

Platform Sessions (PF)

9:45 am11:15 am
Centennial 1&2
PF 10

  • An International Systematic Mapping Review of Occupational Therapy Education: Student Perceptions
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
    Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, St. Catherine University, Minneapolis, MN; Barbara Hooper, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 
    Contributing Authors: Mikaela Caudill, MS, OTR; Lindsay Guzowski, MS, OTR; Kendra Samuelson, MS, OTR; Robin King, MS, OTR; Wendy Wood, PhD, OTR, FAOTA
  • An International Systematic Mapping Review of Occupational Therapy Education: Content, Skills, Teaching Methods and Approaches
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice Barbara Hooper, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    Contributing Authors: Robin King, MS, OTR; Wendy Wood, PhD, OTR, FAOTA
  • An International Systematic Mapping Review of Occupational Therapy Fieldwork Education
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice Michael Roberts, MS, OTR/L, Tufts University, Medford, MA
    This presentation provides a multi-part systematic mapping review that establishes a baseline for the state of occupational therapy educational research. The baseline is then evaluated and directions are proposed for building an educational science in occupational therapy.

9:45 am– 11:15 am
Hanover CDE
PF 11

  • Teaching Evidence-Based-Practice: Student Clinician Collaboration to Increase Relevance
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Patricia Scott, PhD, MPH, OT, FAOTA, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN
    The experience of engaging students in evidence-based practice courses is challenging, particularly when they rarely observe it being used in the clinic. The strategy presented here pairs students with clinicians for students to research, evaluate, and formally present clinicians with answers to their real clinical questions.
  • Building Competencies Through an Integrative Learning Curriculum Model
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Joanne Foss, PhD, OTR/L, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
    Contributing Author: Emily Pugh, MA, OTR/L, LHRM
    Integrative learning provides coherent experiences that enable students to build upon previous learning and transfer it to new and complex situations. This approach can be organized around the OT process. Using integrated courses in adult and pediatric rehabilitation, activities link the knowledge, skills and attitudes critical to OT practice.
  • Creating a Threads-Based Occupational Therapy Curriculum
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Denise Chisholm, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
    An OT program’s core concepts that are curricular threads need to be highly visible in the curriculum design. This presentation will outline a developmental process for identifying and creatively blending the fundamental and distinctive threads that reflect the uniqueness of a specialized program in a specific institution.

9:45 am– 11:15 am
Hanover FG
PF 12

  • Is There a Difference in Self-Perceived Confidence and Competence in OT Students After Participation in Service Learning?
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Karen Ann Cameron, PhD, OTD, OTR/L, Alvernia University, Reading, PA 
    Contributing Authors: Andrew Chen; Aaron Dearstyne
    This research paper will examine the effects of service learning on the development of professional competence and confidence in occupational therapy students, and considerations for educators in the use of service learning to develop these particular skill sets in occupational therapy students.
  • Educating for Cultural Competence: The Impact of Academic Service Learning
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Theresa Leto, DHS, OTR/L, The University of Findlay, Findlay, OH
    Strong practices in education are viewed as one path to achieving the Centennial Vision. Academic Service Learning (ASL) is presented as one experiential learning tool to integrate cognitive and affective learning. Evidence of the effectiveness of academic service learning ) as an approach to teaching cultural competency is examined.
  • Teaching Effectiveness: Preparing Occupational Therapy Students for Clinical Practice
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Jane O’Brien, PhD, OTR/L; Scott McNeil, OTD, MS, OTR/L, both of University of New England, Portland, ME
    This study compares the long-written case study Integrated Performance Procedural Instrument (IPPI) and short performance-based formats Short Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) with student performance in clinical practice, as measured by the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation [FWPE].Data from faculty and student focus groups illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of the educational methodologies.

11:30 am–1:00 pm
Hanover FG
PF 20

  • Peer Mentoring for MSOT Students: Impacts on Collegiality, Academic Achievements, and Leadership Skills
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
    Liat Gafni Lachter, MS, OTR/L; Judith Ruland, PhD, RN, CNE, both of Saginaw Valley State University, Saginaw, MI
    Peer-mentoring is a low-cost intervention that is seldom described for MSOT students. The presented year-long peer-mentoring program yielded measurable improvements in leadership, collegiality, and academic satisfaction. Developing evidence-based peer-mentoring programs is recommended.
  • Bridging Cyberspace Through E-Mentoring
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
    Karen Jacobs, EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA; Nancy Doyle, OTR/L, OTD, both  of Boston University, Boston, MA
    Distance education can bring meaningful learning opportunities to students through appropriate use of learning theory, technology, course design and strategies such as e-mentoring. This paper reviews the research and experience of a distance education post-professional OTD program with e-mentoring. 
  • Establishing a Health Professions Education Peer-Mentoring Program
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
    Ruth Ramsey, EdD, OTR/L, Dominican University of California, San Francisco, CA
    This paper will present the results of a two-year study of a new peer-mentoring program between first- and third-year students in an academic occupational therapy program. Results will be reported and discussed.  Download handout 

11:30 am–1:00 pm
Centennial 1&2
PF 21 

  • The Post-Professional Occupational Therapy Doctorate: A Critical Analysis
    Content Focus: Building Capacity
    Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, St. Catherine University, Minneapolis, MN; Andrea Bilics, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Worcester State University, Worcester, MA; Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD; Claudia Miller, OTD, OTR, Cincinnati State University, Cincinnati, OH; Jeff Snodgrass, PhD, OTR, Milligan College, Milligan, TN
    The results of a comprehensive and systematic analysis of the post-professional OTD will be presented. Discussion will include the critical questions raised from the findings and recommendations for the professional community.

     

  • Faculty Opinions of the Blueprint for Entry-Level OT Education: How Is It Used in Curriculum Development?
    Content Focus: Building Capacity
    Diane Parham, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of New Mexico, Placitas, NM; Katherine Dimitropoulou, PhD, OTR/L, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY; Christine Berg, PhD, OTR/L, Washington University, St. Louis, MO; Lea Brandt, OTD, MA, OTR/L, Missouri H.P. Consortium, Columbia, MO; Maureen Nardella, MS, OTR/L, North Shore Community College, Danvers, MA
    The Blueprint for Entry-Level OT Education is intended to help OT and OTA faculty plan curricula in line with the Centennial Vision. A national faculty survey (N=748) showed how the Blueprint is used and  its impact, and the perceived barriers to its use and suggestions for increasing usefulness. Implications for curriculum planning will be discussed. Download handout

 

  • OT Educational Research: A Survey of Faculty Engagement in Educational Research
    Content Focus: Building Capacity
    Andrea Bilics, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Worcester State University, Worcester, MA; Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OT(c), OTR/L FAOTA, St. Catherine University, Minneapolis, MN
    Contributing Authors: Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Janice Burke, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Barbara Hooper, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
    To achieve the Centennial Vision, OT students need a high-quality, evidence-based education. In 2012, AOTA surveyed faculty to learn the extent to which they engage in research on teaching. This paper will present the findings, contextualize them, and offer suggestions to move forward.

11:30 am–1:00 pm
Hanover CDE 
PF 22

  • A Critical Review of the Student Evaluation of Fieldwork Experience (SEFWE) Tool
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Donna Breger Stanton, MA, OTR/L, CHT, FAOTA, Samuel Merritt University, Oakland, CA 
    Contributing Authors: Tina DeAngelis, EdD, OTR/L; Debra Hanson, PhD, OTR/L; Susan Toth-Cohen, PhD, OTR/L; MJ Mulcahey-Hershey, PhD, OTR/L
    The Student Evaluation of Fieldwork Experience (SEFWE) provides constructive feedback about fieldwork placements used as a review of the experience. This is an important time to ensure that the fieldwork evaluative tools are reflective of the AOTA Centennial Vision, aligned with the fieldwork process and integrated with evidence-based utility.
  • Creating an Evidence-Based, Data-Driven Fieldwork Experience: A Collaborative Process
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Roseann Schaaf, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Susan Santalucia, MS, OTR/L; Caryn Johnson, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, all of Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson School of Health Professions, Philadelphia, PA
    This session describes a model fieldwork site that facilitated evidence-based practice, and trained students to be data driven and outcomes oriented. The steps in development of this program and preliminary data regarding its impact on student and fieldwork educator outcomes are presented.
  • A Facilitated Learning Model to Teach Evidence-Based Habits of Reasoning Across an Integrated MSOT Curriculum
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Ellen S. Cohn, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA
    Contributing Authors: Wendy Coster, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Jessica Kramer, PhD, OTR/L
    A sequence of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) courses that use facilitated learning to promote reasoning skills that are reinforced, and which are routinely practiced through assignments in other classes during an MSOT curriculum, are described. Program evaluation and alumni survey data illustrate how graduates of the program apply their EBP habits during fieldwork and in practice.

Poster Sessions (PO)
1:15 pm–2:00 pm
Hanover AB 

PO 100
Ripples in the SoTL Waters: The Experiences of One Participant's Experience of Being Mentored in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Content Focus: Building Capacity
Lorrie George-Paschal, PhD, OTR/L, ATP, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR; Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, St. Catherine University, Minneapolis, MN; Andrea Bilics, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Worcester State University, Worcester, MA
Contributing Author: Anne Birge James, PhD, OTR/L
An overview will be provided for five Scholarship for Teaching and Learning (SoTL) studies in a line of research that resulted from participation in the American Occupational Therapy Association SoTL mentoring program between 2007–2010. Benefits of the program experience expanded from the participants to include their college and university.

PO 101
Best Practices for Academic Mentorship
Content Focus: Building Capacity
Elizabeth Francis-Connolly, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Amy Lamb, OTD, OTRL, FAOTA, both of Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI
Best practices for mentoring academic leaders will be identified. Presenters will share experiences, strategies, and how to create a culture of collegiality. Participants will leave with ideas for mentoring opportunities; recognize common pitfalls and strategies for avoiding such occurrences.

PO 102
Helping College Students Cope With Academic Stress: An Evidence-Based Occupational Therapy Program
Content Focus: Building Capacity
Beverly St. Pierre, OTD, OTR/L, Bay Path College, Longmeadow, MA
Contributing Author: Ingrid Provident, EdD, OTR/L
Stress is a concern for college students. OT programs focus on educating students in the skills necessary to become therapists; however, they may not teach students how to cope with the stress of academics. This OT program informs academicians of evidence-based techniques to improve student coping style.

PO 103
Teaching Comparative Effectiveness Research Competencies
Content Focus: Building Capacity
Susan Lin, ScD, OTR/L, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD
With the establishment of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, occupational therapy has a prime opportunity to increase research capacity. To be a science-driven profession, our graduates will need to help generate and apply comparative effectiveness research to deliver patient-centered evidence-based care. Download handout

 

PO 104
Creating an Infrastructure to Support Faculty Outcomes Research on Teaching and Learning
Content Focus: Building Capacity
Susan Toth-Cohen, PhD, OTR/L; Susan Wainwright, PT, PhD, both of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
This presentation discusses the Teaching and Learning Initiative, a comprehensive program for building faculty capacity to design and implement educational research in a school of health professions.

PO 105
Social Networking and E-Professionalism: An Emerging Discussion of Ethical and Implications for Students and Practitioners
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Kristin M. Mungovan, MS, OTR; Susan LaCroix, MS, OTR, both of Mount Mary, Milwaukee, WI
Contributing Author: Jan Stevens, OTR Rehab Resources, Inc.
The impact of social media on students, fieldwork, and supervising clinicians will be discussed and compared to the OT Code of Ethics and Ethic Standards (2010). Context will center on the HIPAA implications of social networking, the ethical and legal boundaries, and practice implications related to e-professionalism.

PO 107
An Initial Step Toward Interprofessional Education in an Occupational Therapy Assistant Program
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Cynthia Ballentine, MSOT, OTR/L, St. Louis Community College, St. Louis, MO
OTA and PTA students participated in a ten week multi-disciplinary assignment that allowed them an opportunity to work collaboratively simulating workplace environments. Interprofessional education is a way to assist healthcare students to acquire the skills needed to effectively participate on future inter-professional teams.

PO 108
OTA Program Evaluation: Are Graduates Engaging in Evidence-Based Practice?
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Rivka Molinsky, PhD, OTR/L Touro College, New York, NY
Ongoing research to study whether Touro College OTA alumni have an increase in research participation and evidence-based practice following changes to the program's curriculum. Currently, 78% of participants stated that they use EBP. Results also indicate that curriculum is not the only factor inhibiting research in practice.

PO 109
Developing Generational Competence in Occupational Therapy Students
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Sonia Kay, PhD, OTR/L, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Four generational cohorts are present in occupational therapy academic and clinical environments. Prevention of intergenerational conflict is possible with enhanced knowledge of the similarities and differences of generational cohorts and proactive strategies to create effective communication and interaction.

PO 110
Infusing Institutional Values and Mission as Means of Reflective Professional Development for Occupational Therapy Students
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Karen Ann Cameron; Mary Seamon-Zellers, MS, OTR/L, both of Alvernia University, Reading, PA
Contributing Authors: Neil H. Penny, EdD, OTR/L; Catherine Emery, MS, OTR/L; Gregory A. Chown, OTD, OTR/L, CPAM
This paper will present how occupational therapy departments can utilize institutional mission statements, values and strategic plans to promote sustained contemplation and reflection along the continuum of Level I & II fieldwork seminars to promote positive occupational therapy student professional behaviors.

PO 111
Creating and Assessing an Active Capstone Experience: From Process to Outcomes
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Jean MacLachlan, MS, OTR/L; Jeramie Silveira, OTD, OTR/L; Jeanne Corcoran, OTD, OTR/L; Judith Parker Kent, OTD, EdS, OTR/L, FAOTA, all of Salem State University, Salem, MA
Determining assessment methods that demonstrate student mastery of clinical competencies and professional development provides a challenge for faculty. This presentation showcases a capstone experience that measures learning objectives and program outcomes while simultaneously meeting several ACOTE accreditation standards.

PO 112
Exploring Community Contexts to Facilitate Student Learning: The Art Museum
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Kristin Winston, PhD, OTR/L, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL; Tammy Bickmore, OTD, OTR/L, University of Southern Maine, Lewiston, ME
This paper will present a pedagogical approach of combining a museum visit with reflective writing for facilitating student learning regarding the history and philosophy of the profession. In addition, the paper will present student and faculty perceptions of this community-based learning experience.

PO 113
Incorporating Active Learning Into Interprofessional Education
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Regina Doherty, OTD, OTR/L;  Mary Ellen Evenson, OTD, MPH, OTR/L, both of MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
This presentation highlights occupational therapy's unique opportunity to influence interprofessional education and collaboration. Multiple innovative models of inter-professional education that incorporate active learning instructional methodologies will be described. Download handout

 

PO 114
Infusing the Arts and Humanities Into Occupational Therapy Professional Education
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Kerryellen Vroman, PhD, OTR/L, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH
Reflection and mindfulness are learned and refined with practice. Using teaching exercises, assignments, and examples of students' work, this presentation examines the infusion of the humanities in occupational therapy education. Through the humanities students can acknowledge and understand their own and other people's beliefs and behaviors.

PO 115
SLU OS/OT-Triple Jump: Innovations in Problem-Based Teaching and Learning
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Julia Henderson-Kalb, MS OTR/L; S. Maggie Maloney, PhD, OTR/L, both of Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO
Problem-Based Learning (PBL) promotes student-centered education via case studies. At this session we will discuss our “Triple Jump” program, which is a day-long independent capstone PBL assignment. Informal feedback indicates students find it challenging and stimulating. It is our belief that PBL better prepares students for Level 2 Fieldwork.

PO 116
Faculty-Supervised, Community-Based, Level I Fieldwork: Enhancing Teaching, Practice and Research
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Elizabeth Wittbrodt, MHS, OTR/L; Sarah Austin, PhD, OTR/L; Wanda Mahoney, PhD, OTR/L, all of Chicago State University, Chicago, IL
We will present a Level I fieldwork program where faculty members supervise students in community settings demonstrating how the program enhances teaching and student learning through apprenticeship and allows faculty opportunities to pursue research partnerships and professional development.

PO 117
Using Graphic Syllabus and Concept Mapping to Facilitate Self-Regulated Learning and Development of Clinical Reasoning Skills Among OT Students
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Josephine Chan, PhD, OTR, CHT, Texas Woman's University, Houston, TX
Graphic syllabus with integrated concept maps can be a potentially powerful tool among OT students to facilitate self-regulated learning and development of critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills by mapping out the course organization and progression of learning outcomes in a course.

PO 118
Strategic Planning to Enhance Interprofessional Education (IPE)
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Jennifer Womack, MA, MS, OTR/L, SCDCM, FAOTA, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Efland, NC 
Renewed emphasis on interprofessional education has grown out of efforts to improve collaboration and communication in healthcare. Examples exist of both involvement in and exclusion of occupational therapy in IPE. This session highlights opportunities to ensure that occupational therapy is a valued contributor to and beneficiary of IPE efforts.

PO 119
SLU OS/OT—Fast Talk: Integrating Personal Narrative and Online Technology to Increase Student Participation in Teaching and Learning
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Lenin Grajo, EdM, OTR/L, OTRP, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO
This presentation will describe and discuss the use of Fast Talk, a teaching innovation used for occupational science and occupational therapy course instruction. Fast Talk is the use of personal narrative prompts in blended online and classroom learning formats to enhance student participation and learning of specific and global concepts in a course.

PO 120
Professor and Clinician Collaboration: A Dynamic Classroom Environment
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Anne Escher, MS, OTR/L; Sue Berger, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA, both of Boston University, Boston, MA
This poster describes a co-instructor model between professor and clinician for an entry-level occupational therapy master’s degree program. This collaboration provides two perspectives, small faculty-student ratio, and assures that content taught represents both current and best practice. Download handout

 

PO 121
A Study of Imbedded Psychosocial Strategies Within Physical Disabilities and Pediatrics Coursework
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Sarah Nielsen, PhD, OTR/L; Jan Stube, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Gail Bass, PhD, OTR/L, all of University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND
The aim of this Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) research was to study the effectiveness of methods used to enable students to better address psychosocial factors in all practice contexts. This poster illustrates the process, teaching strategies, results, and recommendations for others who wish to integrate psychosocial content across their curricula.

PO 122
Use of Video Conferencing to Support Students and Facilitate Learning During Level II Fieldwork
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Barbara Nadeau, MA OTR/L, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT
This poster session will describe the use of video conferencing as a method to support student learning during Level II fieldwork. Student perceptions regarding the video conferences will be shared as well as the information required to replicate this project.

PO 123
Student Perceptions of Valued and Engaging Learning Methods Throughout the Curriculum
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Jeffrey Lederer, PhD, OTR/L, Spalding University, Louisville, KY
Students placed high values on active learning methods such as application and examples. Passive learning methods were valued less. Active learning methods were viewed as more engaging compared with passive learning methods. Characteristics of teachers that facilitated engagement were also identified. Download handout

 

PO 124
Clinical Simulation: Enhancing Student Learning Through Horizontal Integration of Cross-Course Content
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Maureen Hoppe, MA, OTR/L; Melissa Kimmerling, MOT, OTR/L, both of College of Saint Mary, Omaha, NE
This poster session will describe the use of clinical simulation as an instructional methodology to
decrease compartmentalized student learning and facilitate integration of knowledge among courses. Theoretical frameworks and strategies for effective classroom integration will be discussed.

PO 125
An Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy Student Lab: First-Steps for Interprofessional Education in a College of Allied Health Sciences
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Mary Hildebrand, OTD, OTR/L; Sue Leach, PT, PhD, NCS, both of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
Interprofessional education (IPE) has been defined as “students from two or more professions learning about, from and with each other.” An OT and PT professor designed an OT/PT student family training lab as a first-step in building IPE between departments. We will discuss implementation, rubric development, and future steps.

PO 126
The Effects of Readiness Assessment Tests on Graduate Occupational Therapy Students’ Understanding of Key Academic Concepts
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Wendy Wachter-Schutz, MS, OTR/L, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
Research has shown a decline in student’s compliance in completing readings prior to class, leaving minimal classroom time to apply and integrate the knowledge from the readings. This presentation will examine the effects that Readiness Assessment Tests have on OT students’ understanding of basic key academic concepts from their assigned readings. Download handout

 

PO 127
Effects of a Modified Problem-Based Learning Class on MSOT Students’ Perceived Competence to Develop Evidence and Occupation-Based Interventions
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Ellen Cohn, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Nancy Lowenstein, MS, OTR/L, BCPR, both of Boston University, Boston, MA
The effects of a modified PBL class on occupational therapy students’ perceived competence to develop evidence and occupation-based interventions are described. This presentation will be particularly useful to educators who are considering implementing PBL approaches with limited resources. Download handout

 

PO 128
Authentic Engagement in Critical Thinking With Professional Issues
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Shirley Peganoff O'Brien, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Eastern Kentucky University, Lexington, KY
Creating meaningful learning activities to promote professional enculturation is critical for the life of a profession. The power of occupation as a central theme enhanced student understanding of their unique and vital role in enacting the Centennial Vision.


Platform Sessions (PF)
2:15 pm–3:45 pm
Hanover CDE

PF 40

  • OT Students' Perception of Evidenced-Based and Occupation-Based practice on Level II Fieldwork
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
    Cindy Hayden, DHEd, OTR/L, CHT; Elaine Fehringer, MA, OTR/L, both of Eastern Kentucky University, Lexington, KY
    This four-year qualitative study examines how an OT curriculum focused on evidence -based and occupation-based practice influenced student perception of fieldwork Level II experiences. Using grounded theory analysis, students' perception was that clinicians relied on evidence-based and occupation-based therapy less than anticipated.
  • Academic Integrity Issues in OT Programs: A National Study
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
    Christy Fellers, OTD, OTR/L, C/NDT; Rachel Moody, both of Milligan College, Milligan College, TN
    Contributing Authors: John Paul Abner, PhD, Victoria Hopson, Heather Mandela, Jennifer Tate, Jeremy Woody
    Our study examines student and faculty perceptions of academic dishonesty among graduate level OT. We concluded that academic integrity issues are prevalent among graduate level OT programs nationally. This is complicated by the differing perceptions of dishonesty that students and faculty hold.
  • Strategies From an Urban Institution on Improving NBCOT Outcomes for MOT Students
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
    Doreen Head, PhD, OTRL; Rosanne DiZazzo-Miller, DrOT, OTRL, CDP, both of Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
    This paper discusses strategies implemented by an urban institution to address low pass rates. Discussion points to strategies including admissions modifications, student focus group findings, resources to aid both students and faculty with test preparation, and curriculum development strategies.

2:15 pm–3:45 pm
Hanover FG
PF 41

  • The Impact of Collaborative Fieldwork Models on Student Experience, Professionalism, and Clinical Capacity.
    Content Focus: Building Capacity
    Stephanie Beisbier, MS, OTR/L, Mount Mary College, Milwaukee, WI; Caryn Johnson, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
    Collaborative fieldwork models are uniquely poised to foster professionalism and competence. An analysis of the literature including guidelines and outcomes is intended to aid academic programs and clinical sites as they collaborate to implement evidenced-based clinical education. Download handout

 

  • A Multidimensional Approach to Building Diversity
    Content Focus: Building Capacity
    Regina Smith, DHS, OTR/L; Leslie Roundtree, DHS, OTR/L; Elizabeth Wanka, DrOT, OTR/L, all of Chicago State University, Chicago, IL
    To meet the Centennial Vision, educational programs must create multidimensional systems to recruit and retain diverse students. This presentation offers strategies to build capacity of the profession to meet the healthcare needs of society through a diverse occupational therapy workforce. Download handout 

     

  • The Role of Community-Based Student Capstone Projects in an Entry-Level Master of Occupational Therapy Program
    Content Focus: Building Capacity
    Tracy Jirikowic; Janet Powell, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Beth Rollinger, MHA, MS; Don Fogelberg, PhD, all of University of Washington, Seattle, WA
    This paper will describe community-based student capstone projects within an entry-level MOT curriculum. Learning goals and activities will be included as they foster student academic and professional development. Collaborative roles between faculty, community clinician and students will be described.

2:15 pm–3:45 pm
Centennial 1&2
PF 42

  • Interprofessional Education Through a University-Based, Intensive, Summer Program for Stroke Survivors
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Sue Berger, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA
    Contributing Authors: Elizabeth Hoover, MS, CCC-SLP, BC-NCD(A); Tami Rork DeAngelis, PT, DPT, GCS; Stacey Zawacki, DrPH, RD
    This presentation will address the development, implementation, and results of an intensive, interprofessional university-based program for stroke survivors. Challenges to implementation and benefits for both the clients and students will be addressed.

     

  • Bridging Collaborative Gaps Through Interprofessional Education and the Use of a Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema Case
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Shannon Mangum, MPS, OTR/L; Jo Thompson, MA, CTRS; Celeste Carter, APRN, DNS, all of Louisiana State University, New Orleans, LA
    Case-based method was used in an interprofessional (IPE) course exploring best-practice for breast cancer related lymphedema. Faculty created a case scenario and screener to assess, educate and foster cultural sensitivity and teamwork among disciplines. Outcomes aim to strengthen collaborative skills and increase knowledge of educational needs. Download handout

 

  • Occupational Therapy Educational Leadership in Developing an Interprofessional Clinical Scholar Program: A Collaborative Between a University and a Hospital System
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Penelope Moyers Cleveland, EdD, OT/L, FAOTA, St. Catherine University, St. Paul, MN
    Contributing Authors: Patricia Finch-Guthrie, PhD, GCNS, RN; Alice R . Swan, PhD, RN
    A clinical scholar program, as part of an occupational therapy graduate program, is presented involving implementation science to create and sustain an interprofessional practice change in a healthcare organization. Discussed is the design of the program, partnership development, infrastructure and costs, and assessment results.

4:00 pm5:30 pm
Hanover FG
PF 30

  • Infusing Interprofessional Education Into Graduate-Level Occupational Therapy Programs: Developing Better-Prepared Clinicians
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
    Liat Gafni Lachter, MS, OTR/L; Jean Prast, OTD, MSOT, OTRL; Ellen Herlache-Pretzer, EdD, MA, OTRL, all of Saginaw Valley State University, Saginaw, MI
    Interprofessional collaborative practice is vital for the provision of high quality patient care. In this presentation, information regarding the infusion of interprofessional education into one graduate-level occupational therapy program, as well as its impact on students, will be provided.

     

  • Comparison of OT and OTA Student Attitudes Towards Interprofessional Education
    Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
    Mary Arvin, OTD, OTR, CHT, University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN
    This abstract seeks to share evidence related to OT and OTA students' perceptions of interprofessional education (IPE). OT and OTA educators are challenged to consider this evidence when planning IPE activities. Download handout

 

  • OT and PT Student Preparedness for Interprofessional Learning
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Kelly Erickson, PhD, OTR/L; Dalerie Lieberz, MA, PT, GCS, both of The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN
    This pilot study utilized the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) with graduate occupational and physical therapy students to address the research question: when are graduate students most ready to participate in an inter-professional learning (IPL) experience?

4:00 pm5:30 pm
Centennial 1&2
PF 31 

  • Flipping the Classroom: The Use of You Tube Videos and Mobile Devices to Supplement Hands-On Learning in Occupational Therapy Curricula
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Robert McAlister, PhD, OTR/L, Prospect, KY
    This presentation reports how OT students actively contributed to a kinesiology lab by creating YouTube videos of range of motion and manual muscle testing demonstrations. Survey results suggest the videos improved course quality, increased student engagement and learning, and improved student confidence.
  • Curricular Design Connecting Competencies for Research and Clinical Competencies: Maximizing Both
    Content Focus: Building Capacity
    Patricia Scott, PhD, MPH, OT, FAOTA; Thomas Fisher, PhD, OTR, CCM, FAOTA, both of Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN
    This paper describes a curricular model to support quality research and the development of occupational therapy professional students prepared to become leaders in the production and utilization of evidence for practice. The model parallels competencies for research and clinical practice to create a community of scholars.
  • Facilitating Mentoring Circles: The Reciprocity of Learning and Leading to Enhance the SoTL in Occupational Therapy Education
    Content Focus: Building Capacity
    Anne James, PhD, OTR/L, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA
    This paper will present the effectiveness of mentoring circles to promote occupational therapy educators’ participation in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Strategies for effective facilitation will be presented based on the literature and the author’s experience participating in a SoTL mentoring circle.

4:00 pm–5:30 pm
Hanover CDE
PF 32

  • SLU OS/OT: The Benefits and Limitations of Interprofessional Education (IPE) Teamwork: A Student Perspective
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Maggie Maloney, PhD, OTR/L, Saint Louis University, Kirkwood, MO
    Contributing Author: L. Bueche; E. Whitley
    Through student voices, this qualitative study validates the utility of including IPE courses as an active learning method to help students develop a greater understanding of OT and other professions, increase their communication and team skills, and experience the power of providing holistic teamwork which is client-centered. Download handout

 

  • Using Interprofessional Education to Develop Desired Graduate Attributes: An Australian Perspective.
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Lisa Broom, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia
    This paper will proffer a theoretical view on contemporary interprofessional education; it will be framed using examples of interprofessional education conducted at an Australian University. Key learnings are identified that may benefit other educators who facilitate interprofessional education.

     

  • Yes We Can! Developing Interprofessional Collaborative (ICP) Core Competencies Through Participation in an Online Learning Community
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Wendy Hildenbrand, MPH, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS
    Contributing Author: Jackie Nowak, MS, APRN-CNS, RN
    Interprofessional education within health professions' curricula aims to support future collaborative practice. This study examines the effectiveness of participation in an online course structured to prepare OT and nursing students to deliberatively work together with the common goal of improving service delivery within health care systems.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2013

PLATFORM SESSIONS (PS)
8:00 am–9:30 am
Hanover FG
PS 10

  • Data Driven Decision Making to Enhance Occupational Therapy Education and Practice
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Roseann Schaaf, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Janice Burke, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson School of Health Professions, Philadelphia, PA
    This session presents a model for infusing an outcome-oriented approach into occupational therapy practice. The Data Driven Decision Making process is presented, its application in occupational therapy education is discussed, and the impact on practitioners’ use of data in practice is evaluated.

     

  • Peer Review to Enhance Teaching Effectiveness in Occupational Therapy Curricula
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Arlene Lorch, OTD, OTR/L, CHES; Mary Muhlenhaupt, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Tina DeAngelis, EdD, OTR/L; Kimberly Mollo, MS, OTR/L, all of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
    In the peer review process, an instructor’s performance is appraised by a fellow instructor. This paper describes the method and outcomes of establishing a meaningful peer review process that embraces faculty values, enhances teaching effectiveness and supports the development of occupational therapy faculty. Download handout

 

  • SESSION CANCELLED BY SPEAKER Classifying the Levels Which Occupational Therapy Educators Use to Address Occupation
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Lauren Musick, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    Contributing Author: Barbara Hooper, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
    There is a priority for occupational therapy education to be occupation-centered, yet the research on occupation-centered education remains limited. This case study of OT and OTA programs analyzed ways that educators address occupation. Given that occupation is complex, educators navigate through several levels to teach occupation.

8:00 am–9:30 am
Centennial 1&2
PS 11

  • Students’ Perception of Their Communication, Physical Skills, and Flexibility After Experiencing Standardized Patient Encounter (SPE): Pre/Post Survey data
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Audrey Zapletal, MS, OTR/L, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
    Standardized patient experiences provide students an opportunity to demonstrate clinical competence in a variety of areas from communication to performing OT intervention skills. Data reflecting changes in OT students’ perception of their performance during the SPE will be shared.
  • Making it Real: Using Simulated Patients to Assess Students’ Preparedness for Level II Fieldwork
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Amanda Giles, MS, OTR/L; Peter Bowman, OTD, OTR/L, OT(C), Dip COT; Patty Coker-Bolt, PhD, OTR/L; Nancy Carson, PhD, OTR/L; Hazel Breland, PhD, OTR/L, MUSC, all of Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
    This course describes an innovative comprehensive student clinical skills assessment that uses simulated patients and reflective video analysis to assess student preparedness for Level II fieldwork. Emphasis is placed on use of effective and empathetic communication as well as self-reflection.
  • Use of Simulation in Occupational Therapy Education: Way of the Future?
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Dorothy Bethea, EDD, MPA, OTR/L, Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC; Dahlia Castillo, MS, OTR/L, Anamarc College, El Paso, TX
    Contributing Author: Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
    National descriptive research study examines the use of simulation as a method of instruction in OT graduate and OTA undergraduate programs in the U.S. Survey compiles how programs view, describe and utilize simulation for teaching and student learning outcomes including future implications.

8:00 am–9:30 am
Hanover CDE
PS 12

  • Graduate Student Experiences in an On-Campus Clinic: A Longitudinal Study
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Kelly Erickson, PhD, OTR/L, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN
    Experiences in an on-campus student-led clinic provide suggestions for didactic and hands-on experiential in graduate curriculum. Insight is provided in development of clinical skills and professional behaviors among students, and opportunities are identified for bridging practice and education between community practitioners and faculty.
  • Comparison of Hybrid and On-Campus Student Outcomes in Doctoral Occupational Therapy Education: Bridging Learning Across 3,348 Miles
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Brenda Coppard, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Alfred Bracciano, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Keli Mu, PhD, OTR/L, all of Creighton University, Omaha, NE
    The focus of this presentation is the findings of a comparison study between the outcomes of on-campus versus hybrid student cohorts in an entry level doctoral OT program. Implications to didactic and experiential learning outcomes, occupational therapy practice and lessons learned will be discussed in depth in the presentation.
  • Reflection-On-Action: Participation Action Research
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Nancy Carlson, PhD, OTR/L, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, PA
    The paper applies participatory action research to assessment practices in occupational therapy education. This application examines students as researchers in and for their own educational program. The paper discusses learning outcomes, ethical issues and the value-added benefit of journaling. Download handout

9:45 am–11:15 am
Hanover CDE 
PS 20

  • The Experience of Academic Success Among Non-Traditional Aged Learners: The Role of Possible Selves in the Persistence of Occupational Therapy Students
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Susan Tons, PhD, OTR/L, CHT, Baker College Center for Graduate Studies, Flint, MI
    Contributing Author: Juliane Chreston OTD, OTRL
    Non-traditional aged learners have difficulty with degree completion. Educators can facilitate persistence of older students in order to decrease the therapist shortage, facilitate a more diverse clinician base and waste less resources. This study explored how adult learners in occupational therapy programs persisted completing their degrees despite facing obstacles. Download handout 

     

  • Literacy-Based Curriculum: A Study of Outcomes
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Katherine Dimitropoulou, PhD, OTR/L; Lynn Hassan, MFA, both of Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY
    An interdisciplinary collaboration between the Department of Occupational Therapy and the Campus Writing Center. We redesigned three courses to focus on students’ literacy skills. In-class tutors, on-line tools, and progressive assignments facilitated the process of learning. Students' scholarly reading, writing and reasoning skills significantly improved.

  • Experiences of Nontraditional Undergraduate Students in an Occupational Therapy Program Cohort
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Crystal Gateley, MA, OTR/L, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
    Occupational therapy programs are seeing growing numbers of nontraditional students. Nontraditional students report very different experiences as compared to their traditional peers. OT faculty can enhance the academic success and educational experiences of nontraditional students through several pedagogical strategies. 

9:45 am–11:15 am
Centennial 1&2 
PS 21

  • Becoming a True Professional: How Do We Teach Values?
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Paula Kramer, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, PA; Charlotte Royeen, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO
    This paper will explore the complexities of professional education, the time spent on the science of practice, and the limited time on the art and values of practice. Provocative questions about teaching professional values will be posed and some strategies for imparting values will be presented. Download handout 

     

  • MOOCS: Advancing the Quality Of and Access To or Compromising Occupational Therapy Education?
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Janet DeLany, DEd, OTR/L , FAOTA; Maggie Reitz, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Towson University, Towson, MD
    The topic of Massive  Online Open Courses (MOOCS) permeates higher education debate. Supporters predict MOOCS will revolutionize education processes. Critics assert that the hype derails serious analysis of educational, fiscal, and access limitations. The Code of Ethics provides a structure for assessing implications of MOOCS for occupational therapy education and practice. Download handout

 

  • Enhancing Occupational Therapy Education Through Faculty Engagement in Curriculum Mapping and Pedagogical Reflection
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Theresa Hand, OTD, OTR/L, CHT; Cheryl MacNeil, PhD, both of The Sage Colleges, Troy, NY
    A participatory evaluation study examined a graduate occupational therapy program using curriculum mapping and reflective faculty interviews. Faculty engaged in analysis of program alignment, pedagogy and assessment and the process resulted in an action plan that enhanced collaboration, and created a more streamlined and integrated program. Download handout

9:45 am–11:15 am
Hanover FG 
PS 22

  • Transitioning the Entry-Level Net-Generation From Classroom Student to Life-Long Learner and Emerging Leader in Fieldwork Education
    Content Focus: Building Capacity
    Patricia Crist, PhD, OTR/L, PC, FAOTA, Northern Arizona University, Phoenix, AZ
    Outcomes will be reported from peer-directed, online learning during Level II fieldwork education to expose net-generation students to on-line content pedagogy for life-long learning transformation related to entry-level, emerging role development as novice fieldwork educators and leaders.

     

  • A Faculty Model to Deliver Hybrid Education: A Case Study
    Content Focus: Building Capacity
    Peggy Martin, PhD, OTR, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN
    Contributing Authors: Christina Bourland, MBA, OTR/L; Terrianne Jones, MA, OTR/L; Virgil Mathiowetz, PhD, OTR/L; Corey McGee, MS,OTR/L; Patricia Schaber, PhD, OTR/L; Erica Stern, PhD, OTR/L
    This paper describes a faculty model used to deliver a predominantly online OT curriculum. New faculty roles emerged in response to the changing hybrid delivery context including course directors, lab instructors, clinical instructors and client instructors. Each role is described and illustrated. Download handout

 

  • Integrating Volunteer Work Into Education: Using Service Learning to Build Clinical Reasoning Skills
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Patricia Coker-Bolt, PhD, OTR/L, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
    Service learning can improve the clinical reasoning skills of occupational therapy students. Specific examples of innovative interprofessional service learning programs will be used to highlight how service learning builds clinical reasoning skills. Ways to engage student reflection and measure clinical reasoning skills will be highlighted.

11:30 am–12:30 pm
Centennial 1&2 
PS 30

  • Building Entry-Level OT Students’ Capacity for Best Practice in Client Evaluation: Strategies to Develop, Deliver and Evaluate Curriculum Content
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Elizabeth Peterson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
    Contributing Authors: Kathy Preissner, MHS, OTR/L; Sara Clark, MS, OTR/L
    This presentation describes strategies that OT educators can use to build students’ capacity for best practice in evaluation. The importance of linking theory, research and practice content in courses; utilizing diverse teaching methods; and using outcome data to revise curriculum content related to evaluation will be highlighted. Download handout

 

  • Maximizing Clinic Readiness Through Classroom Learning
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Mary Leibold, PhD, OTR/L; Nancy Baker, ScD, MPH, OTR/L, both of University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
    Occupational therapy students must be proficient in performing multiple complex psychomotor skills in the classroom. We will describe the method we developed and tested, present successful results, and highlight opportunities for participants to adopt this method in the classroom or during fieldwork.

11:30 am–12:30 pm
Hanover CDE 
PS 31

  • Pedagogy for Enhancing Scholarship: A Framework for Successful Student-Faculty Research Endeavors (Part 1)
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Denise Donica, DHS, OTR/L; Anne Dickerson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
    Developing and effective yet feasible research process within an entry-level master's degree program can be a challenge. This presentation will describe the structure of a program that offers master's thesis or research project supporting faculty member and student partnerships and the resulting success in presentations and publications.
  • Pedagogy for Enhancing Scholarship: Implementing a Framework for Successful Student-Faculty Research Endeavors (Part 2)
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Anne Dickerson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Denise Donica, PDHS, OTR/L, BCP, both of East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
    Implementing a successful student-faculty research program in an entry-level master's degree program is a challenge. This second part of a two-part presentation will describe specific examples of model structure of a Clinical Scholar Research program supporting faculty member and student partnerships.

11:30 am–12:30 pm
Hanover FG 
PS 32

  • Outcomes of a Collaborative Case-Based Module on Student Readiness for Interprofessional Learning and Practice.
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Tracy Wall, PT, MS, both of Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT
    An interprofessional case-based educational module designed for occupational therapy and physical therapy students has the potential to facilitate professional development and readiness for future interprofessional practice in the area of neurorehabilitation.
  • Standardized Patient and Student Perceptions of Clinic Day: Are They in Agreement?
    Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
    Audrey Zapletal, MS, OTR/L, School of Health Professions, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
    The use of high-fidelity simulation activities is limited in OT education. Standardized Patient Encounters (SPE) provides information about the student's clinical knowledge and skill. This paper will illustrate the types of data that can be collected from the SPE and levels of agreement between the SPE and students’ perception of skills performed.

POSTER SESSIONS (PO)
12:45 pm1:45 pm
Hanover AB

PO 207
The Process of Selection: Professional Reasoning and Assessment Tool Choice
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Kelli Reiling, OTD, OTR/L, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 
Contributing Authors: Joan Augustyn, OTS; Alyson Haynes, OTS
This presentation will investigate the professional reasoning process used by occupational therapy students in the selection of assessment tools used for client evaluations at a unique service-learning site. This information provides considerations for linking academic preparation to clinical practice. Download handout


 

12:45 pm–1:45 pm
Hanover AB

PO 200
The POET: Exploring a Formative Method of Faculty Peer-Teaching Assessment
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Jeffrey Crabtree, OTD, MS, FAOTA; Fengyi Kuo, DHS, OTR, CPRP; Patricia Scott, PhD, MPH, OT, FAOTA, all of Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN
The objective of this presentation is twofold: 1) explore the Peer Observation and Evaluation Tool (POET), a formative faculty teaching assessment, and 2) identify the professional development benefits of constructive feedback and documentation of lecturers’ strengths resulting from the process.

PO 201
Learning Clinical Psychomotor Skills Online
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Cindy Hayden, DHEd, OTR/L, CHT, Eastern Kentucky University, Lexington, , KY
A mixed methods research study was conducted to evaluate whether occupational therapy assistant students could learn a psychomotor clinical skill through an online learning environment. Students were able to learn the hands on skill online, but preferred one direct session with instructor to confirm safe technique.

PO 202
Standardized Clients in Case-Based Simulation: Five Years of Development in an Occupation-Based Curriculum
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Tina McNulty, PhD, OTR/L; Beth Cardell, PhD, OTR/L; Pollie Price, PhD, OTR/ L; Louise Dunn, PhD, OTR/L, all of University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
In this paper, we will discuss the development of a standardized actor or client simulation assessment process across three semesters of our occupation-based curriculum. We will elaborate on our experiences as a faculty in shaping and developing the assessment to increase in complexity and to reflect best practices in occupational therapy.

PO 203
Service Learning in Occupational Therapy Education: Infusing Transformative Learning Principles Into Practice.
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Dory Sabata, OTD, OTR/L, SCEM; Lauren Foster, OTD, OTR/L, both of University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS 
This presentation will describe the development of a year-long service learning program that is embedded into the first year occupational therapy curriculum. Presenters will discuss the successes and challenges related to the development and implementation of this project.

PO 204
Teaching Interprofessional Collaboration: Using Online Education Across Institutions
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Christine Myers, PhD, OTR/L; Shirley O'Brien, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY 
Contributing Authors: Susan K. Effgen, PT, PhD, FAPTA; Jane Kleinert, PhD, SLP-CCC
Occupational therapy, physical therapy and speech-language pathology students from two institutions participated in interdisciplinary online courses. This presentation will describe online teaching strategies, issues of teaching across universities, and successful ways of meeting the learning needs of students from each discipline.

PO 205
Using Technology Efficiently: Individual Student Blogs for Reflective Journaling
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Cynthia Bell, PhD, OTR/L; Abigail Boyd; Kelley Powers, all of Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC
Assigning individual student blogs with specific reflective prompts offers a manageable and efficient solution for faculty, while offering personalization from individual students. How to create a reflective journal blog assignment as well as showcasing student examples will be emphasized.

PO 206
Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning: A Natural Fit for Occupational Therapy Education
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Lynn Jaffe, ScD, OTR/L; Robert Gibson, PhD, MSOTR/L; Mariana D'Amico, EdD, OTR/L, BCP, all of Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA
Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) is a well-supported small group approach. Evidence identifies process skills (critical thinking, problem solving, and teamwork) within cycles of exploration, concept invention, and application that improve knowledge and skills. All topics within OT have potential for POGIL application. Download handout

 

PO 207
The Process of Selection: Professional Reasoning and Assessment Tool Choice
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Kelli Reiling, OTD, OTR/L, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS
Contributing Authors: Joan Augustyn; Alyson Haynes
This presentation will investigate the professional reasoning process used by OT students in the selection of assessment tools used for client evaluations at a unique service-learning site. This information provides considerations for linking academic preparation to clinical practice.

PO 208
Pushing Students To Think Beyond the Obvious
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Cristy Daniel, EdD, OTR/L; Kristin Haas, OTD, OTR/L, both of College of Saint Mary, Omaha, NE
This poster will identify characteristics of critical thinkers and instructional methods that educators may use to push students to develop critical thinking skills needed in order to become competent entry-level clinicians. Participants will learn several practical strategies that can be used in the classroom. Download handout

 

PO 209
Creation of a Team-Based Wiki to Foster Analysis of Personal, Occupational, and Environmental Factors Influencing Lifespan Occupational Development
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Rachelle Dorne, EdD, OTR/L, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 
Contributing Authors: Jackie DePeralta; Caitlin Kelly; Elizabeth Fleming; Michelle LaTempe; Harvinder Singh; Christine Ann Yount
The potential educational benefits of wikis are many, including ways to create, format, link, edit, and collaborate. This poster will summarize creation of a group wiki for a lifespan occupational development class. Student and faculty perspectives on challenges and suggestions will be shared. Download handout

 

PO 210
Video Learning Objects: Building Blocks for Enhancing Active Learning and Student Learning Outcomes
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Anne James, PhD, OTR/L, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA; Jan Davis, MS, OTR/L, International Clinical Educators, Inc., Port Townsend, WA
Learn how to utilize video learning objects (VLOs) to create dynamic learning activities, homework assignments, and exams for core concepts in occupational therapy education. Multiple cross-platform examples, including the use of smart phones and tablets, in a variety of OT curricula will be demonstrated. Download handout

 

PO 211
Blended Learning Theory Course: Lessons Learned
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Katherine Dimitropoulou, PhD, OTR/L, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY 
Presentation of a blended course in OT theory with weekly progressive assignments and objectives: Blackboard, GoogleDocs, pbwikis and ipad apps have been evaluated for facilitating student learning. Future directions and suggestions for better implementation of this blended course and similar courses with a scholarly focus are presented.

 

PO 212
Modified Time Use Assessment for Study Schedule
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Julie Kardachi, MA, OTR/L, Touro College,  New York, NY
OTA students may lack the study skills and strategies needed for success. The introductory course includes learning styles, time management and organizational strategies to help students manage the demands of course work. The OTA faculty modified the Barth Time Construction to help students include appropriate study time in their schedules. Download handout

 

PO 213
A Preliminary Look at the Use of Essay and Peer Review Assessment Together as a Tool For Changing Course Culture and Student Learning
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Christine Privott, PhD, OTR/L, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY 
Contributing Author: Cindy Hayden, DHEd, OTR/L, CHT
Participants will understand the benefits of peer assessment and gain an understanding of a methodology at Eastern Kentucky University that uses essay exams coupled with peer-review to evaluate student learning. This teaching and learning approach helps to prepare students for critical thinking and occupation-based practice more effectively.

PO 214
The Use of Student Response Systems to Enhance Student Engagement and Learning
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Mary Kientz, OTD, OTR; Megan Foti, DOT, OTR, both of Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Galloway, NJ
This poster will highlight the benefits and considerations when using Student Response System (SRS) technology in occupational therapy education. Data that addresses the facilitation of learning and student engagement collected after student use of SRS technology will be presented.

PO 215
Engaging Occupational Therapy Students on Level II Fieldwork Through the Use of Synchronous Online Discussion Groups
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Andrea Thinnes, OTD, OTR/L; Anna Domina, OTD, OTR/L, both of Creighton University, Omaha, NE
Is real time face-to-face discussion with classmates and faculty members of value to student that are learning during Level II fieldwork? The speakers will articulate the usefulness of Google Hangout as an online synchronous video discussion tool.

PO 216
Teaching for the Test: Strategies to Enhance Certification Exam Performance in Occupational Therapy Students
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Kari Inda, PhD, OTR; Jane Olson, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, both of Mount Mary College, Milwaukee, WI
This poster provides educators with strategies to enhance certification exam performance in students who have challenges in critical reasoning skills and includes teaching analytical skills for students to reason through test items. Outcome data correlating critical reasoning to exam performance is presented.

PO 217
Service Learning: Learning About Occupation
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Kimberly Hartmann, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Tracy Van Oss, DHS, OTR/L, both of Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT
Service learning requires key elements in its design and careful outcome assessment. With intentional faculty guidance and structured methods of eliciting student reflection, this method can be an effective learning strategy for students to actively engage in learning about the diverse contexts and complexities of human occupation.

PO 219
Service Learning: Homeless Shelter Model
Content Focus: Pedagogy & Instructional Design
Regina Parnell, PhD, OTRL, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
Service learning integrates community service with instruction and reflection to enrich student learning. MOT students provided activities for homeless children and students engaged in reflections following activity groups which provided results from student that described instances of personal growth and explained how the experience would affect them as practitioners.

PO 220
Influences and Perceived Outcomes of Professional Socialization in Occupational Therapy
Content Focus: Building Capacity
Jeff Snodgrass, PhD, MPH, OTR, Milligan College, Milligan College, TN; Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, St. Catherine's University, Minneapolis, MN 
Contributing Authors: Angela Dykes, MS; David Hunter, MS; Tryve Lundgren, MS; Lydia Marshall, MS; Gretchen Quave O'Rear, MS
The findings from a cross-sectional survey examining the outcomes of professional socialization among recent graduates of occupational therapy programs will be presented. The impact of and strategies for professional socialization on the vitality and viability of the profession will be considered.

PO 221
Missouri Health Professions Consortium (MHPC): Breaking the Poverty Cycle While Meeting the Occupational Needs of Rural Communities
Content Focus: Building Capacity
Lea Brandt, OTD, MA, OTR/L, Missouri Health Professions Consortium, Columbia, MO
The MHPC OTA Program works to meet the unmet occupational needs of under-served populations. Additionally, the program has provided educational opportunities to rural, place-bound students producing viable employment options which result in positive economic community outcomes and breaking the poverty cycle for graduates and their families.

PO 222
The Academic Fieldwork Coordinator: Role Activities and Perceptions of Professional Reward
Content Focus: Building Capacity
Debra Hanson, PhD, OTR/L, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; Patricia Stutz-Tanenbaum, MS, OTR, FAOTA, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; Jeanette Koski, MS, OTR/L, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
A national survey of Academic Fieldwork Coordinators (AFWC) in occupational therapy identifies tasks common to the role, the degree to which tasks are professionally rewarding, and factors influencing perceptions. Data is critical to address high-burnout in the role and to guide recruitment, training and retention issues for this crucial position.

PO 223
Building Student Community in an Entry-Level Hybrid Program
Content Focus: Building Capacity
Corey McGee, MS, OTR/L,CHT; Terrianne Jones, MA, OTR/L,CHT; Patricia Schaber, PhD, OTR/L, all of University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 
Community participation is critical to OT students. Addressing the question of whether a hybrid program will allow for community formation, a survey results revealed the students’ pervasive sense of belonging to a community and offered their perspective on what opportunities influenced these beliefs. These findings support the ability of hybrid curricula  to support student community development. Download handout

 

PO 224
The Process of Two U.S. Occupational Therapy Programs Collaborating With Ecuadorian Occupational Therapists to Promote Shared Learning
Content Focus: Building Capacity
Kate Barrett, OTD, OTR/L, St. Catherine University, St. Paul, MN; Sue Berger, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA; and Ellen S. Cohn, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA, both of Boston University, Boston, MA
This poster presentation will describe the process of two United States OT programs collaborating with Ecuadorian occupational therapists to promote shared learning. The program partnership between faculty and students provides a rich opportunity for learning across both state and country borders.

 

PO 225
Building the Foundation for Eudaimonic Practice Across the Curriculum
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Regina Lehman, MS, OTR/L; Naomi Greenberg, FAOTA, both of LaGuardia Community College, Long Island City, NY
Eudaimonic well-being addresses the importance of psychological well-being as it relates to activity performance and satisfaction with life regardless of physical abilities. Creating experiences across the curriculum that applies eudemonics will reinforce the core philosophy of occupational therapy and its application to all areas of practice.

PO 226
The Community Fieldwork Planning Matrix: An Effective Method for Maximizing the Learning Environment in Settings with Non-Traditional Supervision
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Arlene Lorch, OTD, OTR/L, CHES; Tina DeAngelis, EdD, OTR/L, both of Thomas Jefferson University, Jenkintown, PA
This poster describes a method and a tool for structuring a clinical education program in community fieldwork settings challenged by limited direct supervision time. Effective strategies for organizing the clinical education environment to maximize the student’s experiential and self-directed learning will be described.  Download handout

PO 227
Graduate Students' Perceptions of Active Class Participation: A Phenomenological Study
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Cynthia Carr, DrOT, MS, OTR/L, Governors State University, University Park, IL 
Contributing Author: Divya Sood, OTD, OTR/L
Active student participation is an essential component in adult learning. A two-phased, qualitative research study was conducted to explore the phenomenon of active class participation from the lived experiences of the MOT students. This poster will illustrate the themes as presented in a model.

PO 228
Preparing Occupational Therapy Students for Alternative Leadership Roles
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Patricia Gentile, DPS, OTR/L, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center and New York University–Occupational Therapy Program, New York, NY
AOTA Centennial Vision identified building the profession’s capacity to lead as a key objective. Preparing students to assume alternative leadership roles is essential. This poster highlights importance of alternative leadership roles and offers practical ways to incorporate them into curriculums. Download handout

 

PO 229
Foundations for Learning: Epistemic and Ontological Cognition of Occupational Therapy Students
Content Focus: Foundations for OT/OTA Education & Practice
Anita Mitchell, MS, OTR, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Bartlett, TN
Epistemic and Ontological Cognition (EOC) affect learning and achievement and are important for educators to understand. This study used quantitative and qualitative data to compare the EOC of entering and post-didactic OT students. Post-didactic students demonstrated more sophisticated stances on OT-specific knowledge than incoming students. Download handout

 

Saturday, October 5, 2013
2:00 pm–3:00 pm
Closing Panel
Centennial 1&2

The Research Agenda for Occupational Therapy Education

Janice P. Burke, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA; Andrea Bilics, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Worcester State University, Worcester, MA; Ellen Cohn, DrSC, OTR/L, FAOTA, Boston University, Boston, MA; Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, St. Catherine’s University, Minneapolis, MN; Debra Hanson, PhD, OTR, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; Barb Hooper, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD

Over the last two years, a concerted effort has taken hold to address the development of a research agenda for occupational therapy education. Task force groups, educator survey, and academic leaders participation in workshops at the AOTA Annual Conference & Expo have provided the venues for collecting input and feedback on the development of the research  agenda. This presentation will focus on identifying  the development of the agenda, the role the agenda will play in ensuring educational  preparation and hence the profession’s commitment to  the occupational needs of society, as well as the challenges of the changing higher education environment.